Arachnid

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Dr.Von Wild

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atelierentomologica:

Herman Henstenburgh, 1667-1726, Netherlands

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mucholderthen:

VAMPIRE DEER? SABRE TOOTH DEER?
Deer with Fangs: Not your mother’s Bambi

[1]  Chinese Water Deer (Hydropotes inermis)
The head of a Chinese water deer on display at the Natural History Museum at Tring, a branch of London’s Natural History Museum.

SOURCE: Vampire Deer by MykReeve on Flickr.

[2] Tufted Deer (Elaphodus cephalophus)
A species of small Asian deer characterized by a prominent tuft of black hair on the forehead and, in males, fang-like canines.

It is restricted to the forested mountains of northeast Burma and south central China (also known as the Golden Triangle) which reach heights of 4500 m above sea level, This and its crepuscular habits make study difficult.

SOURCES: animals - Taringa! , Zoochat, and the Wikipedia

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estrellavega:

I recently completed silkscreening my “tree of life” print. It’s an edition of 20 printed on Stonehenge vanilla paper. You can read the sordid manufacturing details here. I based the information the tree is built on from the book :The tree of life: A phylogenetic classification, so if there’s any information that’s wrong (which I assume there will eventually be), blame the book. Because there’s only so much I can comfortably fit on a 22x30 inch piece of paper, I decided to focus on lifeforms people can see with the naked eye. 

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hazel-morgan:

Crustaceans (and a bivalve) fineliner illustration.

Goose barnacles are the most amazing things!

© Hazel Morgan

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wapiti3:

Iguana on Flickr.


Gottlieb Tobias Wilhelm Reptile & Amphibian Copper Engravings 1810

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mentalalchemy:

age-of-awakening:

Lessons on sacred geometry with the use of it throughout ancient and modern architecture….even to our genetic code 0.o

What book is this?

almondseed:

C. J. Rollin

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